Q & A

Q & A

Prices LED Screens, LED Displays and Electronic Billboards

How Much does a LED screen or LED display cost?

The price or cost of a LED screen, LED display or electronic billboard depends on two variables. Those two variables are the total size of the LED screen, and the total resolution of the LED screen.

1.The total size of the LED screen: The bigger or larger the LED screen the higher the cost. The prices are based on USD/sqm, which means that if the total size is 24sqm, the price will be 24 multiplied by the cost per sqm.

2.The total resolution of the screen: The more pixels, or the more number of LED´s, the screen has the higher the cost will be. For example if a screen is 12sqm and has 49,000 pixels, it will be cheaper if the LED screen is 12sqm with 120,000 pixels. This is because more LED lamps will be placed onto the screen which is a higher cost. But on the other hand the more LED´s the screen has, the higher the detail will be of the videos and images that the LED screen will be publishing.

Why LED screens have different costs and prices?

Everything depends on the customers´ needs. Some customers want the public to see their LED screen from a distance of 10 meters and further, and others from 20 meters and further. The more resolution/sqm a screen has the closer will be the viewing distance without loosing detail looking at the screen from closeby. For that we always need the client to answer us several questions to determine the right LED screen size and resolution and come with the right proposal. Nothing is predetermined, but based on the needs of the client.

If you want to know what are our prices per square meter please let us know and give us a call, or contact us by writing an email or online chat. We can send you our prices and you can figure out what will be the right size and right resolution for your LED screen that fits your budget.

LED Screens and Refresh Rate

What is the refresh rate for LED screens?

The refresh rate of a LED screen is the number of times in a second that the LED screen hardware draws the data. This is distinct from the measure of frame rate in that the refresh rate for LED screens includes the repeated drawing of identical frames, while frame rate measures how often a video source can feed an entire frame of new data to a display.

For example, most movie projectors advance from one frame to the next one 24 times each second. But each frame is illuminated two or three times before the next frame is projected using a shutter in front of its lamp. As a result, the movie projector runs at 24 frames per second, but has a 48 or 72 Hz refresh rate.

Increase refresh rate for decreasing LED screen flickering
On LED screens, increasing the refresh rate decreases flickering, thereby reducing eye strain. However, if a refresh rate is specified that is beyond what is recommended for the LED screen, damage to the display can occur.

Normally Qiangli Jucai LED screens have a refresh rate of over 1920Hz, which is more than 40 times the refresh rate of a normal cathode television which is 50Hz (PAL and SECAM) or 60Hz (NTSC). For rental display Qiangli Jucai LED screens can reach a refresh rate of over 3840Hz, which means that they won´t show any flickering when recorded with a video camera and broadcasted live on television.

What is a LED Screen?

A LED screen is a video display which uses light-emitting diodes. An LED panel is a small display, or a component of a larger display or screen. They are typically used outdoors in store signs and billboards, and in recent years have also become commonly used in destination signs on public transport vehicles. LED panels are sometimes used as form of lighting, for the purpose of general illumination, task lighting, or even stage lighting rather than display.

Types of LED Screens
There are two types of LED panels: conventional (using discrete LEDs) and surface-mounted device (SMD) panels. Most outdoor screens and some indoor screens are built around discrete LEDs, also known as individually mounted LEDs. A cluster of red, green, and blue diodes is driven together to form a full-color pixel, usually square in shape. These pixels are spaced evenly apart and are measured from center to center for absolute pixel resolution. The largest LED display in the world is over 1,500 foot (457.2 m) long and is located in Las Vegas, Nevada covering the Fremont Street Experience. The largest LED television in the world, the Center Hung Video Display at Cowboys Stadium, is 160 by 72 feet (49 by 22 m), 11,520-square-foot (1,070 m2).

Most indoor screens on the market are built using SMD technology—a trend that is now extending to the outdoor market. An SMD pixel consists of red, green, and blue diodes mounted on a chipset, which is then mounted on the driver PC board. The individual diodes are smaller than a pinhead and are set very close together. The difference is that the maximum viewing distance is reduced by 25% from the discrete diode screen with the same resolution.

Indoor use generally requires a screen that is based on SMD technology and has a minimum brightness of 600 candelas per square meter (cd/m², sometimes informally called nits). This will usually be more than sufficient for corporate and retail applications, but under high ambient-brightness conditions, higher brightness may be required for visibility. Fashion and auto shows are two examples of high-brightness stage lighting that may require higher LED brightness. Conversely, when a screen may appear in a shot on a television studio set, the requirement will often be for lower brightness levels with lower color temperatures (common displays have a white point of 6500 to 9000 K, which is much bluer than the common lighting on a television production set).

For outdoor use, at least 2,000 cd/m² is required for most situations, whereas higher-brightness types of up to 5,000 cd/m² cope even better with direct sunlight on the screen. (The brightness of LED panels can be reduced from the designed maximum, if required.)

Suitable locations for large display panels are identified by factors such as line of sight, local authority planning requirements (if the installation is to become semi-permanent), vehicular access (trucks carrying the screen, truck-mounted screens, or cranes), cable runs for power and video (accounting for both distance and health and safety requirements), power, suitability of the ground for the location of the screen (if there are no pipes, shallow drains, caves, or tunnels that may not be able to support heavy loads), and overhead obstructions.